Veteran’s Benefits: A Helpful Guide

CareGivers America is proud to offer the Aid and Attendance Benefit. Partnering with Veteran’s Home Care, we can help you navigate the steps to qualify for this benefit in order to assist with Activities of Daily Living for you or your loved one. Please visit our website www.CareGiversAmerica.com in order to locate the office near you and learn more about this offer.

Read the article below to learn more about getting financial aid for a Veteran. 

Question: Are VA benefits automatic for my Dad or does he have to enroll?

Answer: Several years ago, Congress passed the Veterans Health Care Eligibility Act, stating that any veteran who wants to receive VA health care needs to fill our Form 10-10EZ and there are three ways he can get it:

  1. Visit, call or write a local VA care or benefits office listed in the blue pages of the phone book under the federal government.
  2. Call the VA Enrollment Center at 1-877-222-VETS.
  3. Simply download the form and file it electronically by going to the VA website at www.va.gov

Hopefully your Dad kept his Honorable Discharge Certificate (DD-214) because he’ll need to give them a copy. Once your Dad enrolls, he’ll be assigned one of two eligibility categories: the “must-do” group, consisting of veterans who have a service-connected disability, former POWs, World War I veterans and low-income veterans. Depending upon funding, the VA may also offer some nursing home care to this group. The VA may provide health care services to the “may-do” group, depending upon the resources available to the Department of Veterans Affairs. These veterans will have to pay a co-payment for the care.

In addition to an eligibility category, your father will be assigned to one of seven priority groups. Vets with a service-connected disability that is 50 percent or more disabling are given priority one status. Most veterans of WWII fall into priority group five-they don’t have a disability connected to the war, but their annual income and net worth are considered “low income” as determined by the VA system. Those who have higher incomes can still received services, but they pay a higher co-pay.*

Veterans accepted for enrollment in the VA health care system can receive inpatient and outpatient services, including preventative and primary care. Prescriptions are covered when veterans receive their treatment from a VA medical facility. Most of the time, the veteran will be asked to pay a $2 co-pay. *

If your Dad qualifies, he could receive primary care from outpatient clinics, community-based care, some nursing home care, home-based primary care, adult day care, rehabilitation, diagnostic and treatment services, and hospital (medical and surgical) inpatient care. If the VA doesn’t operate a facility where your father lives, they can send him to one located nearest to him or subcontract with another provider to give him the service. It’s certainly worth the effort for your father to enroll and find out what kind of health care he could receive in return for his service.

*Advice in this article is subject to change. Consult with the VA system to learn more. 

Information provided by Dr. Linda Rhodes, Finding Your Way, 250 Real Life Questions and Commonsense Answers http://lindarhodescaregiving.com/index.htm