Study Shows Connections with Community, Family Most Important to Seniors

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Source from the Pennsylvania Home Care Association

Relationships with friends and family outweigh financial concerns among older Americans seeking fulfillment in their senior years, according to the second annual United States of Aging Survey. When asked what is most important to maintaining a high quality of life in their senior years, staying connected to friends and family was the top choice of four in 10 seniors, even ahead of having financial means.

For the 2013 edition of the United States of Aging Survey, the National Council on Aging (NCOA), UnitedHealthcare and USA TODAY surveyed 4,000 seniors ages 60 and older. This year, for the first time, the survey also included adults ages 18-59 to provide contrasting perspectives on aging and explore how the country could better prepare for a booming senior population.

The study finds that seniors have maintained a positive outlook on their future and the aging process. Eighty-six percent say they are confident about their ability to maintain a high quality of life, and 60% expect their health to stay the same during the next five to 10 years (compared with 53% of adults ages 18-59).

Most seniors (71%) feel the community they live in is responsive to their needs, but less than half (49%) believe their city or town is doing enough to prepare for the future needs of a growing senior population. Twenty-six percent say their city or town should invest in better public transportation, and 23% say their city or town should invest more in affordable healthcare services and housing.

Click here to download the study.