Diabetic Friendly Recipe-Spicy Candied Nuts

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Recipe from the American Diabetes Association

Traveling during the holidays? Plan ahead and make some take-along, like this Spicy Candied Nuts that gets sweetness from Splenda® Brown Sugar Blend.

Serving Size: 1/4 cup nuts
Servings Per Recipe: 18

Ingredients:
1 egg white
1 tablespoon water
1/2 pound shelled walnut halves
1/2 pound shelled almonds
1/4 cup Splenda® Brown Sugar Blend
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1 pinch Pinch of ground red pepper

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 250 degrees F.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk egg white and water until frothy. Add walnuts and almonds and stir to coat completely.
  3. In a large plastic bag, combine SPLENDA® Brown Sugar Blend, cinnamon, ginger, salt, coriander, allspice, and pepper. Holding the open end tightly, shake vigorously to blend. Add half of the nuts to the bag and shake to coat thoroughly.
  4. Remove nuts and place on a large nonstick baking sheet. Repeat with remaining nuts and spices, and spread on the baking sheet.
  5. Bake, stirring and smoothing nuts into a single layer every 15 minutes. Bake until nuts are caramelized, about 45 minutes.
  6. Allow nuts to cool.

Nutrition Information
Calories: 170
Total Carbs: 7g
Total Fat: 15g
Saturated Fat: 1.5g
Dietary Fiber: 3g

Not all recipes presented here are necessarily appropriate for all people with diabetes, nor will all recipes fit into every meal plan. No two meal plans are alike. Work with your health care provider, diabetes educator or dietitian to design a meal plan that’s right for you, and includes the foods you love. A key message for people with diabetes is “Carbs Count.” Foods high in carbs (carbohydrates) — bread, tortillas, rice, crackers, cereal, fruit, juice, milk, yogurt, potatoes, corn, peas, sweets — raise your blood glucose levels the most.

For many people, having 3 or 4 servings of a carb choice at each meal and 1 or 2 servings at snacks is about right. Keep an eye on your total number of servings. For example, if you choose to have dessert, cut back on potatoes.

Round out your meals with a serving of:

  • Meat (such as fish or chicken) or meat substitute (such as beans, eggs, cheese, and tofu) about the size of a deck of cards and
  • Non-starchy vegetables (such as broccoli or lettuce). If you have three (3) or more servings of non-starchy vegetables, count them as a carbohydrate choice. Three (3) servings is equal to 1 1/2 cups of cooked vegetables, or three (3) cups of raw vegetables.

Check your blood glucose to see how your food choices or these recipes affect your blood glucose. If your meal plan isn’t working for you, talk to your dietitian about making a new one.

Along with exercise and medications (insulin or oral diabetes pills), nutrition is important for good diabetes management. By eating well-balanced meals in the correct amounts, you can keep your blood glucose level as close to normal (non-diabetes level) as possible.